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Full text of "The Mother Goose Primer"

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HARVARD COLLEGE LIShAJV 

GIFT OF 

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DEC 11 1»30 



Copyright, 1910, 
By CHARLES E. MERRILL CO. 



TO THE TEACHER 

This little Primer, for children just beginning to read, is 
written in the belief that their first reading lessons will appeal 
most strongly to their interest if founded on ideas which are 
already familiar. 

Before the children are allowed to read from the book 
they should have much blackboard reading based upon the 
Mother Goose rhymes which are here used. 

Each rhyme in the book is preceded by a full-page illustra- 
tion. The children will readily talk about the picture, and will 
then be eager to read the simple sentences which follow the 
rhyme, and conclude with a prose version of the rhyme, a page 
of review sentences, and a page of action sentences. 

After the child has learned to read the simple sentences 
here given, the Primer suggests more formal work by pre- 
senting the A, B, C's and their sounds, as helps in later 
reading. 

BELLE WILEY 



Little Boy Blue, 

Come, blow your horn. 
The sheep's in the meadow. 

The cow's in the corn. 
What! is this the way 

You mind your sheep, 
Under the haycock, fast asleep? 



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Little boy, little boy. 

Little Boy Blue, Little Boy Blue. 

Boy Blue, Boy Blue, Boy Blue. 



Wake up, little boy. 

Come, Little Boy Blue, wake up. 

Wake up, wake up, wake up! . 



Come, Little Boy Blue, wake up, wake up. 

Are you asleep, little boy? 

Are you fast asleep. Little Boy Blue? 

Wake up, wake up, wake up! 

Little Boy Blue, you are fast asleep. 



Little Boy Blue, Little Boy- Blue ! 
Come, you are fast asleep. 
You are fast asleep under the haycock. 
See Little Boy Blue under the haycock. 
Come, little boy, wake up. 



Why are you asleep, little boy? 

Why are you fast asleep under the haycock ? 

Wake up, Little Boy Blue, wake up. 

Blow your horn, little boy ! 

Blow your horn. Little Boy Blue ! 

Blow, blow, blow! 

10 



Blow your horn. Little Boy Blue. 
Blow for your sheep. 
Blow for your cow. 
Blow for your sheep and cow. 
Blow your horn for your sheep and cow. 
Come, blow your horn, Little Boy Blue! 
11 



See your sheep, Little Boy Blue. 

See your cow, Little Boy Blue. 

See your cow and sheep. Little Boy Blue. 

Your sheep is in the meadow. 

Your cow is in the corn. 

Do you see your sheep in the meadow? 

Do you see your cow in the corn? 

Can you see your sheep and cow, little boy ? 




Blow, blow, blow! 
What a sleepy little boy! 
What a sleepy Little Boy Blue! 
Call your sheep. Little Boy Blue. 
Call your cow, Little Boy Blue. 
Call your sheep from the meadow. 
Call your cow from the corn. 
Sleepy Little Boy Blue ! 



Blow your horn, Little Boy Blue. 

Call your sheep and cow, Little Boy Blue. 

Is this the way you mind your sheep? 

Is this the way you mind your cow? 

Is this the way you mind your cow and 

sheep, Little Boy Blue? 
Blow your horn for your sheep and cow, 

Little Boy Blue. 
Blow your horn, blow, blow! 
14 



Little Boy Blue, come, blow your horn. 
The sheep's in the meadow. 
The cow's in the corn. 

What, is this the way you mind your sheep, 
under the haycock, fast asleep? 
16 



Little Boy Blue, Little Boy Blue. 

Come, blow your horn. 

Blow, blow, blow! 

The sheep's in the meadow. 

The cow's in the corn. 



What, is this the way you mind your sheep ! 
What, is this the way you mind your cow ! 
Why are you fast asleep under the haycock? 
What a sleepy little boy ! 
What a sleepy Little Boy Blue! 



Come, Little Boy Blue, wake up, wake up ! 

See your sheep and cow, Little Boy Blue. 

Call to your sheep and cow. 

Call, call, call ! 

Call your sheep from the meadow. 

Call your cow from the corn. 

16 



ACTION SENTENCES 

Play you are Little Boy Blue. 

Play you are fast asleep under the haycock, 

^ Little Boy Blue. 
Wake up, Little Boy Blue. 
Blow your horn. Little Boy Blue! 
Call your sheep and cow. Little Boy Blue ! 
Come, cow and sheep; Boy Blue calls you. 



17 



18 



Baa, baa, black sheep, have you any wool ? 
Yes, sir; yes, sir; three bags full. 
One for my master, one for my dame, 
And one for the little boy that lives in the 
lane. 



19 



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1* ^.: 

Little sheep, little sheep ! 

Have you any wool ? 

Have you any black wool ? 

See my wool, little boy. 

See, I have soft, black wool ! 

Do you like my soft, black wool, little boy? 

Soft wool, soft wool, black wool, black wool ! 

20 



Baa, baa, baa ! 

I have one bag full of wool. 
I have two bags full of wool. 
I have three bags full of wool. 
One, two, three bags! 
One, two, three bags full of wool. 
One, two, three! 
21 



One, two, three bags full of wool ! 
One bag of wool is for my master. 
One bag of wool is for my dame. 
One bag of wool is for the little boy. 
He is the little boy that lives in the lane. 
He is a good little boy. 
He likes my soft, black wool. 
22 



Baa, baa, black sheep ! 
Have you any wool ? 
Yes, sir ; yes, sir ; three bags full. 
One bag is for my master. 
One bag is for my dame. 
One bag is for the little boy that lives in 
the lane. 

28 



Baa, baa, baa ! 
Good sheep, good sheep! 
Black sheep, black sheep ! 
Have you any wool ? 

Yes, sir, I have one bag of wool. 
Yes, sir, I have two bags of wool. 
Yes, sir, I have three bags of wool. 
One, two, three bags full of wool ! 
One bag is for my master. 
One bag is for my dame. 
One bag is for the little boy. 
The little boy lives in the lane. 

Three bags full of wool. 

Soft wool, soft wool ! 

Black wool, black wool ! 

Wool for my master, wool for my dame. 

Wool for the little boy in the lane. 

24 



ACTION SENTENCES 

Play that you are a black sheep. 

"Baa, baa," says the black sheep. 

Say "good morning" to the black sheep. 

Feel his black wool. 

Play that the sheep has three bags full of 

wool. 
Give one bag to his master. 

Give one bag to his dame. 

Give one bag to the little boy. 



25 



I like little pussy, 

Her coat is so warm, 
And if I don't hurt her. 

She'll do me no harm ; 
So I'll not pull her tail. 

Nor drive her away. 
But pussy and I 

Very gently will play. 



27 



Pussy, pussy, pussy ! 

Come, pussy, come! 

Dear little pussy ! 

I like you, little pussy. 

Will you come to me, pussy ? 

I will play with you. 

I will not hurt you. 

You are a good little pussy. 

Come, pussy, come ! 



Meow, meow, meow! 

I will come to you. 

I will play with you. 

Shall we run, pussy ? 

Shall we jump, pussy ? 

Shall we run and jump, pussy ? 

Run to me, pussy. 

Run and jump, pussy. 

Run, run, run ! 



Good pussy, good pussy ! 

Her coat is so warm. 

See, I feel her warm coat. 

I do not hurt her. 

I do not pull her tail. 

I play with her very gently. 

You will not harm me, will you, pussy ? 

You are a very gentle pussy. 



Little pussy, do you like to have me stroke 

your warm coat ? 
You stroke ray coat very gently. 
I like to have you play with me. 
You do not hurt me. 
You do not pull my tail. 
You do not drive me away. 
You are a very gentle little girl. 
31 



Dear, gentle, little pussy ! 
I like your warm coat. 
I like to play with you. 
I like to run with you. 
I like to jump with you. 
Run with me, pussy, run! 
Jump with me, pussy, jump! 
Run and jump, jump and run ! 



I like little pussy. 

Her coat is so warm! 

If I do not hurt her, she will do 

harm. 
I will not pull her tail. 
I will not drive her away. 
Pussy and I will play very gently. 
Dear, good, little pussy ! 



What a gentle little pussy! 
What a warm coat she has! 
Will you play with me, pussy ? 
What shall we play ? 
Shall we run and jump, pussy? 

Run, run, run ! 

Jump, jump, jump ! 

I will not hurt you. 

You will not harm me. 

I will not drive you away. 

We will play very gently, dear pussy. 

I like you, dear little pussy. 

Meow, meow, meow ! 

I like you, little girl. 

You stroke my warm coat very gently. 

You are a good little girl. 

I like to run and jump with you. 

34 



ACTION SENTENCES 

Play you are a little pussy. 

Come, pussy, come to me. 

We will play with little pussy. 

Jump, pussy, jump. 

Run, pussy, run. 

What does pussy say ? 

Will you stroke pussy's warm coat ? 

Will you run and jump with pussy ? 



35 



There were two little blackbirds 

Sitting on a hill, 
One named Jack, 

And the other named Jill. 
Fly away, Jack ! 

Fly away, Jill! 
Come again. Jack! 

Come again, J ill ! 



37 



See the little blackbirds ! 

One, two little blackbirds ! 

They are sitting on a hill. 

They will sing to you, little girl. 

They wil) sing to you, little boy. 

They will sing to you, little boy and girl. 

Happy little blackbirds, sitting on a hill I 



One sings, " My name is Jack." 

Tlie other sings, "My name is Jill." 

Are you happy, J ack ? 

Are you happy, J ill ? 

Happy Jack, happy Jill, sitting on a hill! 

Sing, sing, sing ! 

Sing your sweet song, Jack and Jill. 



See Jack and Jill flap their wings. 

They flap their wings to fly away. 

Their mother sits in the tree. 

They love their dear mother. 

They will fly to her. 

They will fly to their home in the tree. 

They are not baby birds. 

They can fly, and hop, and sing. 



Do you see our mother, little girl ? 

Do you see our mother, little boy ? 

See, there she sits in the tree. 

She calls to us, little girl, little boy. 

We sing to our mother when she calls. 

When we were baby birds, we could not fly. 

When we were baby birds, we could not hop. 

Now we can fly, and hop, and sing. 




Good-by, little girl. 
Good-by, little boy. 
Do not fly away, Jack. 
Do not fly away, Jill. 
See, their mother calls. 
There she is in the tree. 
She calls to Jack and Jill. 
She says, "Come, Jack; come. 
Fly away, Jack; fly away, Jill. 

42 



Jill." 



Good-by, Jack; good-by, Jill. 

Fly away home, Jack. 

Fly away home, Jill. 

Fly to your mother, Jack. 

Fly to your mother, Jill. 

Will you come again. Jack? 

Will you come again, Jill? 

Happy Jack, happy Jill! 

Fly to your home in the tree. 

43 



Yes, we will come again. 

Will you come to our home, little boy? 

Will you come to our home, little girl ? 

We will sing to you from our nest. 

Our mother will sing to you, too. 

She is our dear, good mother. 

We love our dear mother. 

See, we fly to her! 

Good-by, good-by ! 




There were two little blackbirds, sitting on 

a hill. 
One's name was Jack. 
The other's name was Jill. 
Fly away, Jack! 
Fly away, Jill ! 
Come again. Jack ! 
Come again, Jill ! 
Good-by, Jack and Jill! 



There were two blackbirds sitting on a hill. 
One's name was Jack. 
The other's name was Jill. 
They were not baby blackbirds. 
They could fly, and sing, and hop. 
They were very happy blackbirds. 

Their mother called from her nest. 
They loved their mother. 
They liked their nest in the tree. 
Their nest was high in the tree. 
They fly to their nest in the tree. 
They were happy little blackbirds. 

They flap their wings, when they fly. 
They fly high, high, high. 
They like to fly high. 
Up, up, up to the tree-top! 
Up, up, up to their nest ! 

46 



ACTION SENTENCES 

Play you are Jack. 

Play you are Jill. 

Play you are sitting on a hill. 

Fly away, Jack. 

Fly away, Jill. 

Your mother calls to you. 

See your mother in the high tree-top. 

She is singing to you now. 

She is singing a sweet song. 

Will you sing to me. Jack and Jill? 



47 



H ickory, dickory, dock ! 
The mouse ran up the clock ; 
The clock struck one, 
And down he ran, 
Hickory, dickory, dock! 



49 



What a tall clock ! 
What a tiny mouse ! 
Little mouse, do not run away. 
Come, little mouse, run to me. 
I will not hurt you. 
You will not harm me. 
Come, little mouse, come. 
50 



See how fast the little mouse runs. 
He runs away from me. 
He runs up the clock. 
Little mousie, are you frightened ? 
Why do you run away from me? 
I will not harm you, little mousie. 
I will not hurt you, little mousie. 
Why do you run up the tall clock ? 



Oh ! What is that ? 

It frightens the little mouse. 

It is the clock, little mouse. 

The clock struck one. 

The clock will not hurt you. 

The clock will not harm you. 

You need not run away, little mouse. 

Dear, little, frightened mouse ! 



Little mousie has ran away. 

He ran up the clock. 

The clock strack one. 

It frightened the little mouse. 

Down the clock ran the little mouse. 

He ran away very fast. 

Little mouse, come back, come back ! 

I will play with you, little mouse. 



Up, up, up! 

Up the tall clock he ran. 

Down, down, down ! 

Down the tall clock he ran. 

The mouse ran up, the mouse ran down. 

Come back, little mouse. 

64 



Hickory, dickory, dock ! 
The mouse ran up the clock. 
The clock struck one. 
The little mouse ran down. 
Up and down, up and down ! 
Hickory, dickory, dock ! 



Hickory, dickory, dock! 
See the little frightened mouse. 
Up he runs, down he runs! 
Down he runs, up he runs ! 
Up and down, down and up! 

Why do you run, Httle mouse ? 
Were you frightened, little mouse ? 
What frightened you, little mouse ? . 
Why do you run up the clock? 
Why do you run down the clock? 

The tall clock strikes one. 

What a frightened little mouse to run away! 

The clock will not hurt you, little mouse. 

Do not run away, little mouse. 

Come, little mouse, come! 

Come, come, come ! 

Hickory, dickory, dock! 

56 



ACTION SENTENCES 

Play you are a little mouse. 

Play you are a tall clock. 

See the little mouse run up the clock. 

The clock strikes one. 

Little mousie is frightened and runs away. 

Come,, little mouse, come to me ! 

Run, little mouse, run to me! 



57 




68 



Jack and Jill went up the hill, 
To draw a pail of water; 
Jack fell down and broke his crown, 
And Jill came tumbling . after. 



59 



This is Jack and that is Jill. 

Jack is a little boy and Jill is a little girl. 

Jack is Jill's brother. 

Jill is Jack's sister. 

Do you like Jack and Jill? 

Do you like the brother and sister? 

Do you know where they are going ? 

60 



Where are you going, Jack ? 

Where are you going, Jill? 

We are going up the hill. 

We are going up the hill for water. 

We will fill our pail with water. 

Mother needs the water. 

We love our good mother. 



See the well on the hill. 
Jack and Jill went up the hill. 
They went up the hill to the well. 
They wished to draw a pail of water. 
See them draw the water. 
. See them fill the pail with water. 
They will carry the water to their mother. 




See, they come down the hill ! 
They have the pail of water. 
It is very heavy for Jack and Jill. 
Be careful, Jack! Be careful, Jill! 
Do not fall down the hill. 
The pail of water is too heavy for a little 
boy and girl. 



Jack fell down the hill. 

He broke his crown. 

Jill came tumbling down the hill after Jack. 

Jack got up and so did Jill. 

They picked up their pail. 

Then they ran home to their mother. 




Jack and Jill went up the hill. 
They wished to draw a pail of water. 
Jack fell down. 
He broke his crown. 
Jill came tumbling after him. 
Poor Jack, poor Jill! 
66 



This is Jack and that is Jill. 

They are brother and sister. 

Jack and Jill went up the hill. 

They went up the hill to the well. 

They went up the hill to draw a pail of water. 

The pail of water was too heavy to carry. 

Poor Jack, poor Jill ! 

They fell down the hill. 

Jack broke his crown. 

They both got up. 

Then they ran home to their mother. 

Their mother said, "Jack, are you hurt?" 
Their mother said, "Jill, are you hurt?" 
"Yes, mother dear, we fell down the hill." 
Jack said, " I hurt my crown." 
Jill said, " I came tumbling after Jack." 
"We are happy to be home, mother dear." 

66 



ACTION SENTENCES 

Will you play you are Jack? 

Will you play you are Jill? 

See Jack and Jill go up the hill. 

They have a pail. 

They go to the well. 

See them fill their pail with water. 

Jack and Jill come down the hill. 

Jack falls down. 

Jill tumbles after him. 

They both go home to their mother. 



67 



Ding, dong, bell, pussy's in the well. 

Who put her in? Little Johnny Green. 

Who pulled her out ? Great Johnny Stout. 

What a naughty boy was that. 

To drown poor pussy cat, 

Who never did him any harm. 

And killed the mice in his father's barn. 



69 



Ding, dong, bell ! 

Dear me, dear me! 

Do you see that well? 

Poor pussy cat, poor pussy cat ! 

She is in the well, she is in the well. 

Ding, dong, bell ! 

Ding, dong, bell ! 

TO 



Who put her in ? 

It was little Johnny Green. 

What a naughty, naughty Johnny Green ! 

He put poor pussy in the well. 

What a very naughty boy, to drown poor 

pussy cat ! 
Poor pussy cat, poor pussy cat ! 
71 



Ding, dong, bell! 

The pussy cat 's in the well. 

Who put her in ? 

It was naughty Johnny Green. 

Who pulled her out? 

It was great Johnny Stout. 

What a naughty Johnny Green! 

What a great Johnny Stout ! 

Ding, dong, bell I 



Oh, you naughty Johnny Green! 

Oh, you great Johnny Stout! 

Why did you do it, Johnny Green ? 

Pussy is good. 

Pussy is gentle. 

Pussy never did you any harm. 

Oh, why did you drown Httle pussy ? 

Naughty boy, naughty boy! 

We do not like you, Johnny Green. 



What a naughty boy was Johnny Green, to 

drown a poor pussy cat ! 
Pussy never did any harm. 
She killed the mice in his father's barn. 
She was a good pussy cat. 
He was a naughty Johnny Green. ' 
He was a great Johnny Stout. 
Naughty Johnny Green ! 
Great Johnny Stout! 



Ding, dong, bell, the cat 's in the well ! 

Who put her in? 

Little Johnny Green put her in. 

Who pulled her out? 

Great Johnny Stout pulled her out. 

What a naughty boy was that, to drown 

poor pussy cat I 
Pussy never did any harm. 
She killed the mice in his father's barn. 
76 



Ding, dong, bell ! 

Ding, dong, bell ! 

Poor pussy cat, poor pussy cat! 

Poor pussy cat was drowned in the well. 

Who put her in ? 

Who pulled her out ? 

Who was Johnny Green ? 

Who was Johnny Stout? 

Poor pussy cat, who put you in the well ? 

Who pulled you out of the well ? 

Pussy, you never did any harm. 

You killed the mice in his father's barn. 

What a naughty, naughty Johnny Green ! 

What a great, great Johnny Stout! 

Johnny Green put you in. 

Johnny Stout pulled you out. 

Johnny Stout loves you, little pussy cat. 

76 



i 



ACTION SENTENCES 

Play you are Johnny Green. 

Play you are Johnny Stout. 

Play you are pussy cat. 

See Johnny Green put poor pussy in the well ! 

See Johnny Stout pull pussy out ! 

Clap your hands for Johnny Stout. 

Stroke pussy's soft coat. 

Run away, Johnny Green. 



77 



78 



Pat-a-cake, pat-a-cake, baker's man! 
So I do, master, as fast as I can. 
Pat it, and prick it, 
And mark it with T, 
And then it will serve 
For Tommy and me. 



79 



Good morning, good morning! 

Good morning, happy baby. 

Are you having a good time? 

You are a happy Tommy. 

I can tell from your smile. 

Smile, Tommy, smile! 

Mother will play with her baby boy. 



See baby Tommy and his mother. 
Mother says, " Pat-a-cake, pat-a-cake." 
Baby claps his hands and smiles. 
Do you like to have mother play with you? 
Do you like to play "pat-a-cake, pat-a-cake, 

baker's man"? 
Do you like to clap your hands. Tommy? 



Pat-a-cake, pat-a-cake, baker's man. 

So I do, master, as fast as I can. 

Pat it, and prick it, and mark it with T. 

Then it will serve for Tommy and me. 

Tommy claps his hands. 

" More, more," he says. 

Mother smiles and does it again. 




Clap, clap, clap go baby's hands. 

Baby likes to have mother say " pat-a-cake.' 

Happy, happy baby boy! 

Pat-a-cake, pat-a-cake, baker's man! 

So I do, master, as fast as I can. 

Pat it, and prick it, and mark it with T. 

Then it will serve for Tommy and me. 



Happy baby boy! 

Good-morning, Tommy! 

Good mother to play with Tommy ! 

Clap, clap, clap, go Tommy's hands. 

Pat-a-cake, pat-a-cake, baker's man ! 

So I do, master, as fast as I can. 

Pat it, and prick it, and mark it with T, 

Then it will serve for Tommy and me. 

Happy, happy, baby boy! 

He is having a good time. 

Tommy loves his dear mother. 

He says, " Mother, I love you." 

Mother smiles, too. 

She says, " Tommy, I love you. 

I love you, my dear little boy." 

Good little Tommy! 

Dear, dear mother! 

84 



ACTION SENTENCES 

Play pat-a-cake, pat-a-cake. 

Clap your hands for baby. 

Stir the cake. 

Pat the cake. 

Prick the cake. 

Mark the cake with T. 

Give the cake to baby Tommy. 

See baby eat the cake. 

Tommy says, "pat-a-cake, pat-a-cake." 



85 



There was an old woman, 

Who lived in a shoe; 
She had so many children, 

She didn't know what to do. 
She gave them some broth 

Without any bread. 
She whipped them all soundly 

And put them to bed. 



i 



87 



Old woman, old woman! 

Where do you live? 

Do you live in this shoe? 

What a very queer house! 

Do you like your queer house, old woman? 

Why do you live in a shoe, old woman? 

You are a very queer old woman. 



So many boys and girls! 

They are the old woman's children. 

How many children have you, old woman? 

Are your children good? 

Are your children happy? 

Do all of the children live in the shoe? 

Do they like to live in a shoe? 



Poor, poor old woman! 
She has so many, many children ! 
She doesn't know what to do. 
One, two, three children! 
Four, five, six children! 
Seven, eight, nine children! 
Ten, eleven, twelve children! 
All live in this queer shoe. 




Poor, poor children ! 

See, they are crying! 

They are very hungry. 

They cry for their supper. 

The old woman gives them some broth. 

The children cry for bread. 

Give your children some bread, old woman ! 

They like bread with their broth. 



See the old woman ! 
She doesn't know what to do. 
Her children cry for bread for supper. 
She gives them no bread. 
She whips them all soundly. 
Then she puts them to bed. 
Poor, little, unhappy children ! 
One, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, nine, 
ten, eleven, twelve unhappy children! 



There was an old woman. 

She lived in a shoe. 

She had so many children that she didn't 

know what to do. 
She gave them some broth without any bread ! 
She whipped all the children soundly and put 

them to bed. 
Poor hungry children ! 
Poor unhappy children ! 



There was an old woman. 
She lived in a shoe. 
She had many, many children. 
She had so many children, she didn't know 
what to do. 

One, two, three, four children! 
Five, six, seven, eight children! 
Nine, ten, eleven, twelve children! 
Twelve boys and girls! 

Her children were very hungry. 
She gave them some broth. 
She whipped them all soundly. 
Then she put them to bed. 
Poor, unhappy, little children! 
She gave them no bread. 
They were very hungry children. 
Twelve hungry children! 

94 



ACTION SENTENCES 

Play you are the old woman. 

Play you are the old woman's children. 

Play you are hungry. 

The old woman gives you some broth. 

Play you cry for some bread. 

Your mother whips you all soundly. 

Go to bed, children, go to bed! 



95 



Tom, Tom, the piper's son. 

Stole a pig, and away did run. 

The pig was eaten, 

And Tom was beaten. 

And Tom ran crying down the street. 



97 



Tom, Tom, why do you run ? 

You are a naughty boy. 

You stole a pig. 

Hear the pig squeal. 

It calls the piper. 

"Master, Tom is running away with me!" 

Why do you not come, master ? 

Tom is running very fast. 



Poor little pig, poor little pig ! 

Why did Tom steal you, little pig ? 

Why does Tom run away with you ? 

Squeal, squeal, squeal ! 

Call, call, call! 

Call for your master, little pig. 

Tom, you are a naughty boy. 

Oh, why did you steal the little pig ? 



What a naughty boy to steal a pig! 

What a naughty boy to eat the pig! 

Why did you do it, Tom ? 

Naughty, naughty Tom! 

It was not your pig. 

Your father will whip you, Tom. 

100 



Tom, Tom, the piper's son ! 
He stole a pig and away did run. 
The pig was eaten and Tom was beaten. 
Tom ran crying down the street. 
Naughty Tom, he stole a pig! 
Naughty Tom, to eat the pig ! 

101 



Who stole the pig? 
Tom stole the pig. 
Who was Tom ? 
The piper's son. 
Who ate the pig ? 
Tom ate the pig. 
Who ran away ? 
Tom ran away. 



Who was beaten ? 
Tom was beaten. 
Who beat Tom ? 
His father beat him. 
Who ran down the street? 
Tom ran down the street. 
Poor little pig! 
Poor, naughty Tom ! 
Why did you eat the pig? 

102 



ACTION SENTENCES 

Will you play you are Tom? 

Will you play you are the pig? 

Tom, Tom, why do you run? 

Hear the pig squeal! 

Squeal, squeal, squeal, for your master! 

Oh ! the pig was eaten. 

Oh ! Tom ate the pig. 

Play you are Tom's father. 

See Tom's father whip him. 



103 



How many days has my baby to play? 
Saturday, Sunday, Monday, 
Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, 
Saturday, Sunday, Monday. 



106 



Baby likes to play. 
She plays with her dolly. 
She plays that she is mother. 
She plays that dolly is her baby. 
She plays house with her baby. 
She is a good mother. 
She loves her doll baby. 
Dolly loves her mother, toe. 

106 



To-day is Sunday. 
Dolly is going to church. 
She has on a pretty dress. 
Do you like your carriage, dolly? 
I will wheel you in your carriage. 
Good-by, good-by, dolly! 
Good-by, good-by, baby! 
Have a happy time. 
107 



Today is Monday. 

Monday is wash day. 

What a tiny wash-tub! 

What a tiny wash-board! ^ 

" Let me help you wash, mother," says dolly. 

"When you are a big girl, dolly," says mother. 

See baby wash the clothes. 

See baby hang the clothes out to dry. 




To-day is Tuesday. 

Tuesday is ironing day. 

Do you see the tiny ironing board? 

Do you see the tiny iron? 

Baby is ironing dolly's clothes. 

See how careful she is. 

She is a very careful mother. 

She smiles at her dear doll baby. 



To-day is Wednesday. 
Wednesday is scrubbing day. 
See baby scrub the floor of her tiny house. 
Baby likes a clean house. 
Dolly wishes to help her baby mother. 
Baby says, " No, no. 

"When you are a big girl, dolly dear, you 
can help mother." 

110 



To-day is Thursday. 
Thursday is mending day. 
See what baby has! 
She has a needle and thread. 
She has a tiny thimble. 
She is mending dolly's dress. 
It is a pretty blue dress. 
Dolly likes her pretty blue dress. 
Ill 



To-day is Friday. 

Friday is sweeping day. 

See baby sweep the floor. 

What a tiny broom ! 

Dolly's house will be clean. 

Baby sweeps, and sweeps, and sweeps. 

She is a good mother. 

She likes to clean house. 

112 



To-day is Saturday. 

Saturday is baking day. 

Baby is baking a cake for dolly. 

See her stir, and stir, and stir. 

Dolly likes cake. 

" Pat-a-cake, pat-a-cake, baker's ma 

That is what dolly says. 

Baby smiles at her happy dolly. 



Baby has seven days for play. 
Sunday, one day. 
Monday, two days. 
Tuesday, three days. 
Wednesday, four days. 
Thursday, five days. 
Friday, six days. 
Saturday, seven days. 



Sunday is the day for church. 

Monday is wash day. 

Tuesday is ironing day. 

Wednesday is scrubbing day. 

Thursday is mending day. 

Friday is sweeping day. 

Saturday is baking day. 

Sunday, Monday, Tuesday, 

Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday. 

114 



r 



ACTION SENTENCES 

Play you are baby. 

Play you are dolly. 

Wheel dolly in her carriage. 

Wash dolly's clothes in the tub. 

Hang them out to dry. 

Iron dolly's clothes. 

Scrub the floor. 

Put oh your thimble. 

Mend dolly's clothes. 

Sweep the floor with a broom. 

Stir the cake. 

Eat the good cake. 



115 



Here's A,B, C, D, 
E, F, and G, 

H, I, J. K, 
L, M, N, O, P, 
Q. R, S, T, 
U, V, W, 

And oh, dear me! 
When shall I learn 
My A, B, C ? 



117 



This little girl's name is Edith. 

What are you doing, Edith? 

I am playing school with my little sister. 

See, we have our blocks ! 

They are A, B, C blocks. 

They say. A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I, J, 

K, L, M, N, O, P, Q, R, S, T, U, 

V, W, X, Y, Z. 

118 




My sister likes to play school. 

I like to play school with my little sister. 

I am the teacher. 

I say, A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I. J, K, 
L, M, N, O, P, Q, R, S, T, U, V, 
W, X, Y, Z. 

Baby sister picks up the blocks as I tell 
her their names. 

119 



Let us both say them, little sister. 

A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I, J, K, L, M, 

N, O, P, Q, R, S, T, U, V, W, X, 

Y, Z. 
Baby claps her hands. 
She likes to say the A, B, C's. 
She likes her A, B, C blocks. 
Have you A, B, C blocks ? 



See the pictures on the blocks. 
Teacher said that — 

A stands for Acorn. 
B stands for Baby. 
C stands for Cake. 
D stands for Dolly. 
E stands for Edith. 
F stands for Father. 

G stands for Girl. 
H stands for House. 
I stands for Ice. 
J stands for Jack. 
K stands for Kitty. 



L stands for Lane. 

M stands for Mother. 

N stands for Needle. 

O stands for One. 

P stands for Pussy. 

Q stands for Queen. 

R stands for Rock. 

S stands for Sister. 

T stands for Thread. 

■ 

U stands for Unit. 

V stands for Violet. 
W stands for Wool. 
X stands for Xerxes. 

Y stands for Yeast. 
Z stands for Zebra. 

These are the A, B, C's. 

Do you know them, little girl ? 

Do you know them, little boy? 

122 



ACTION SENTENCES 

Play that you are A, B, C blocks. 
Will you sound a ? 
Will you sound b? 
Will you sound c ? 
Will you sound d ? 
Will you sound e? 

Will you sound f? 
Will you sound g ? 
Will you sound h? 
Will you sound i ? 
Will you sound j ? 

Will you sound k ? 
Will you sound 1 ? 
Will you sound m? 
Will you sound n ? 
Will you sound o ? 

123 



Will you sound p ? 
Will you sound q? 
Will you sound r? 
Will you sound s? 
Will you sound t? 

Will you sound u ? 
Will you sound v? 
Will you sound w? 
Will you sound x? 
Will you sound y? 
Will you sound z? 

Give two sounds for a 
Give two sounds for e. 
Give two sounds for i. 
Give two sounds for o. 
Give two sounds for u. 
Give two sounds for c. 
Give two sounds for g. 

124 







WORD 


LIST 






6. Little 




cow 


20. 


have 


23- 


yes 


Boy 




and 




any 




sir 


Blue 








wool 






7. wake 


12. 


is 
in 




black 
my 


25. 


says 
feel 


up 
come 

8. are 




meadow 

corn 

do 


- 


I 

soft 
like 




his 

has 

give 
•• 


you 
asleep 




can 


21. 


haa 
one 




mornmg 


fast 
9. under 


13. 


what 

a 

sleepy 




bag 
full 
of 


28. 


pussy 

dear 

me 


the 




call 




two 
three 




will 


haycock 




from 






with 


see 








WAAA ^0^0 




not 


10. why 


14. 


this 


22. 


master 




hurt 


blow 




way 




dame 






your 
horn 




mind 




he 
that 


29. 


meow 
shall 




16. 


to 




lives 




we 


II. for 








lane 




run 


sheep 


17. 


play 




good 




jump 



125 




30. her 


39- 


. name 


43. again 


56. strikes 


coat 




Jack 






so 




other 


44. nest 


60. brother 


warm 




Jill 


too 


sister 


pull 




sweet 


45. was 


know 


tail 




song 


I ^ 


where 


very 






46. high 


going 


gently 


40. 


flap 


tree-top 


•' 


harm 




their 




6 1 . water 


gentle 




wings 


50. hickory 


fill 


4 ' • 




fly 


dickory 


pail 


31. drive 




mother 


dock 




away 




sits ^ 


tall 


62. well 


stroke 




love 


clock 


went 


girl 




home 


tiny 


wished 


33' if 




tree 


mouse 


draw 


she 




baby 


51. how 


them 


no 




hop 


inousie . 


carry 


35. does 


41. 


our 


frightened 


63. heavy 






there 


52. Oh 


be 


38. birds 




us 


it 


careful 


they 




when 


struck 


fall 


sitting 




were 


need 


- 


on 




could 




64. fell 


hill 




now 


53- ran 


broke 


sing 






down 


crown 


happy 


42. 


good-by 


back 


came 



126 



tumbling 


73- 


never 


88. 


old 


92. 


whips 


after 




' 




woman 




soundly 


got 


74. 


killed 




shoe 




bed 


did 




mice 




queer 




unhappy 


picked 




father 




house 




• 


then 




barn 


^^ 




93- 


an 
had 


65. him 
poor 


77- 


clap 
hands 


89. 


many 

children 

all 




gave 
without 


66. both 








mx 








80. 


time 






98. 


stole 


67. go 




Tommy 
tell 


90. 


four 
five 




pig 
hear 


70. ding 




smile 




six 




squeal 


dong 








seven 






bell 


81. 


pat-a-cake 




eight 


99. 


steal 


cat 




man 


• 


nine 










baker 




ten 


lOI. 


piper 


71. who 








eleven 




son 


put 


82 


as 




twelve 




eaten 


Johnny 


\j^ , 


prick 
mark 








beaten 


Green 










street 


naughty 




91. 


cry 






drown 




serve 
more 




hungry 
supper 


102. 


ate 
beat 


72. out 








some 






great 


85. 


stir 




broth 


106. 


dolly 


Stout 




eat 




bread 




doll 



127 



107. to-day 




clothes 




thread 


121. 


pictures 


Sunday 




dry 




thimble 




stands 


church 












acorn 


pretty 


109. 


Tuesday 


112. 


Friday 




ice 


dress 




ironing 




sweeping 




kitty 


carriage 




iron 




broom 






wheel 














108. Monday 


no. 


Wednesday 


113- 


Saturday 


122. 


queen 
rock 


wash 




scrub 




baking 




unit 


day 




floor 








violet 


tub 




clean 


118. 


Edith 




Xerxes 


board 




may 




am 




yeast 


let 








school 




zebra 


help 


III. 


Thursday 




blocks 






big 




mending 










hang 




needle 


119. 


teacher 


123. 


sound 



128 



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